BUSINESS

Maintaining positivity key to success in sales in Greenserv

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Jamie in the midst of her deligent work. Photo by Sagan Boehm.

By Sagan Boehm
Oxford Stories

Patience can be a difficult skill, but it’s important in the sales industry. Working an 8-5 job of cold call sales, Jamie Holcombe must stay positive in her job at the Oxford-based company, Greenserv.

“Being a sales representative for a medical waste service provider comes with its complications,” Holcombe said. “The businesses we work with has to follow strict guidelines with OSHA and other federal regulations … We work with nursing homes, tattoo parlors, veterinarians, and dentists, just to name a few.”

The products and services Holcombe sells are waste boxes/bins that must be properly disposed of in accordance to government regulations. She initiates the sale by using wit and charm.

“There are no scripts involved,” she said. “Unlike other companies, we don’t read off a sheet of paper to our customers. We want it to be more personal and to have a good relationship with them.”

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The typing involved in this line of work. Photo by Sagan Boehm.

Though Holcombe has been with the company eight months, Greenserv started as a small, private business five years ago. They now supply to more 600 clients, and their headquarters is home to eight dedicated employees.

Holcombe said the office is laid-back, but she realizes it can sometimes take awhile before she sells anything. Her calm, collective personality is attested by her friend and ex-coworker of more than 20 years, Margo Reeves.

Reeves said Holcombe is “a person that loves her customers and will make sure they are being treated with the utmost respect. Her sense of humor is great and will always get you through the not so fun days at work.”

One business day factor is getting used to the operation of computers, software, phones, and headsets. “She does not like all the new technology, but is a very adaptable person,” said Reeves.

The main program used by employees is called “Pipedrive.” Reeves said its creators were tech-savvy, because they have created a straightforward approach to organize the list of clients that have been contacted and who still need to be. This program, she said, is the pinnacle of the company’s structure. It is the first thing she logs on to regularly, barring the days of travel.

Once a week, Reeves is sent out into the field for a sales expedition. The potential locations are in Mississippi, Louisiana and Tennessee. Trucks for the company are sent out three days a week, and the primary focal point now is Memphis.

During these outings, several things happen – packages of supplies are dropped off at their designated locations, established meetings are carried out, and cold-call or random occurrences that might lead to a sale are looked for.

Motivation can be found in the money. Greenserv employees are paid on salary and commission. Last month alone, Holcombe closed nine deals. The family-owned business allows people like her to thrive in a competitive market.

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Responding to emails from Holcombe’s favorite customers. Photo by Sagan Boehm.

Maintaining positivity and drive is key to success. “We always said we knew it was a great day when we came in the room and could hear her laughing with customers,” Reeves said, referring to her fiend. “She is highly motivated and diligent.”

Holcombe offered advice to potential sales employees. She said you won’t sell to every person you contact, and there won’t be daily success, but once the initial stress is over, the calm comes after the storm. She said, as long as they have good interpersonal skills, potential employees shouldn’t worry about not being successful.

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